Photoshoot Andrei Bratu

Last Friday I had a great photoshoot in Zurich (CH) with actor and improv theatre maker Andrei Bratu from Improteca! I was impressed with his body language and Andrei’s ability to change his facial expressions. I was also impressed with all his work for ASK, All Special Kids


Panasonic Lumix G81M | Olympus Zuiko 25 mm 1.8

Photoshoot Friederike

I had a lot of fun doing a photoshoot with Friederike Sommer two weeks ago! Friederike is a Coach, Mentor, Leadership & Team Developer (http://www.friederikesommer.com/). We took a number formal, as well as informal pictures. We also planned to take some shots outside, but the rain was horrendous. How happy I was that I had my Tamron 35 1.8 lens with me – the only lens I have for my Nikon D750 which claims to be weatherproof!

DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-1DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-2DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-3DA Fotoshoot Frederieke A-4DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-5DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-6DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-7DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-8DA Fotoshoot Frederieke-9


Nikon D750 | Tamron 28-75 2.8 | Tamron 35 1.8


A chance encounter with Pirmin Huber

I love traveling by train in Switzerland. Not only is it fast, reliable and convenient; it also provides the opportunity for chance encounters.

Yesterday I met Pirmin Huber on a train to Zurich. Pirmin is a fantastic (bass) musician and composer. His music is a wonderful eclectic combination of jazz and folk music. At times, Pirmin’s music reminds me of Wolfert Brederode and Jan Garbarek. After he generously allowed me to take a few pictures of him, we had a nice chat about his music and his upcoming gigs.

Check him out on pirminhuber.com! I am looking forward to attending one of his concerts soon.

pirmin huber-2pirmin huber-1


Equipment: Nikon D750 – Tamron 28-75


 

Big Heads Martin Schoeller Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam

I really enjoyed visiting the exposition Big Heads by German photographer Martin Schoeller in the Fotomuseum earlier this year. ‘Big Heads’ is a series of close-up portraits taken of (mostly) celebrities, taken with a wide angle lens from a short distance with a large format camera and a large aperture. The pictures only show the face of the subjects – even their necks are not visible.

Martin Schoeller explains this unusual perspective from the fact that, when he was an unknown photographer, he did not get much time and possibilities to influence the location or the clothing of his subjects. Cleverly, he decided to turn this weakness in a strength. Instead, the had to work fast and accept the location and clothing as a given.

Martin Schoeller explains the choice of celebrities as subjects due to this upbringing in post-war Germany where heroes and worshipping them, was not done due to the second world war. For this reason, he was surprised by the celebrity culture in the USA when he emigrated to this country.

Prior to establishing himself as an independent photographer, he worked as an assistant for Annie Leibovitch. He credits his technique to Bernd and Hilla Becher, who became famous for their work of identical industrial installations.

The Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam is located in Katendrecht, in the neighborhood of Hotel New York. the former terminal building of the HAL (Holland America Line). Here a number of emigrants left Europe for the US.

Schoeller Big Heads TMP-17Schoeller Big Heads TMP-13Schoeller Big Heads TMP-14Schoeller Big Heads TMP-1Schoeller Big Heads TMP-3Schoeller Big Heads TMP-4Schoeller Big Heads TMP-5Schoeller Big Heads TMP-6Schoeller Big Heads TMP-7Schoeller Big Heads TMP-8Schoeller Big Heads TMP-10Schoeller Big Heads TMP-16Schoeller Big Heads TMP-18Schoeller Big Heads TMP-19

 


All pictures were taken with a Sony Cyber-shot DSC RX100 (Mark I)